Sacred Succulents


Trichocereus
sp. ‘Daemonomania’

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Conservation of Resilient Biodiversity through Propagation, Dissemination and Education

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Here are PDF downloads of each section of our full catalog:
(9/21/21 – these replace any previous version and web listings)

Cactaceae

Trichocereus List

Other Succulents & Xerophytes

Andean Ethnobotanical Offerings

Andean Tubers

Medicinals, Edibles, CA Natives

Books & Products

Order Form

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Website updated 11/18/21

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10/27/21 We are happy to report that rains have come early to us this season over 10″ in the past week (along with 54+ hours of no power, thank you PG&E). This is the first time in the last 4 years we’ve made it to rain without fires near us and forced evacuations. I can’t overstate what a difference it makes not to be acutely worried over fire destroying our gardens & greenhouses, home and library.

We got word that our friend Gabriel Howearth was swept away in a flood this August. Gabriel was a lauded conservationist and co-founder of Seeds of Change. He’s been an inspiration and unwavering champion of our own work for the past two decades.
One of the great seedsman of our age, gone…
You can read more about him:
https://bioneers.org/a-tribute-to-gabriel-howearth-champion-of-biodiversity-zmbz2109/?

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10/10/21 We are entering another hiatus on shipping new orders until spring 2022.

While we are delighted in the growing interest in our work, the exceptional number of orders in the past week has already overwhelmed what we can realistically ship this fall and still tend other nursery necessities.
All existing orders and those confirmed by email in the last week will ship this autumn.?

New orders are welcome, just know they will not ship until next year (exact date TBA, likely starting late March).
The exception to this will be any plants on our monthly Specimen List or from upcoming Auctions–these we will continue to ship over the coming months.

We may also provide a window this winter where we’ll be shipping Andean Tubers– more info to come.

Thank you for your ongoing patience, understanding and support.

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9/21/21? We’ve had numerous power outages in recent weeks (in just the last 5 days we’ve had 2 different whole days without power, thank you PG&E!) which has caused a number of computer problems for us and delayed web updates & auctions.

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We have begun shipping the summer orders that were on hold—all orders received before Sept. 15 should ship in the next 1–3 weeks.
However, we are not resuming normal shipping at this time as we’d hoped:
at this point we don’t expect to resume a regular shipping routine until next spring.
Until then all new orders should be emailed to me as inquiries before any payment is sent
( sacredsucculents@hushmail.com or benkamm@monitor.net ) —I can then confirm stock and give you an estimated ship time for your order.

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The last 2 years have been over full with unprecedented calamities & problems consuming most of our time. Though we made significant progress with the nursery this summer, the whole dynamic still has us in a situation where, as much as it pains us, we feel that our only option is to continue to limit the number and frequency of orders for a time. This is the only way we can actually get caught up with absolutely essential nursery renovations, protect the long term viability of Sacred Succulents and ultimately return to the level of customer service that we have historically offered (which has been elusive this past year.)
I know this is inconvenient but it is the best we can do given the circumstances.

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8/21/21 Gratefully the frequency of crises has significantly ebbed recently. The shockingly poor rainfall this past winter does mean the flow of our spring has already slowed to a concerning level. After 23+ years of hand watering we have begun the laborious process of installing irrigation systems where we can. This will not only save us water but time and hopefully begin to curtail the high plant mortality we’ve experienced the last two years due to the erratic extreme heat.
Even as we reconfigure and downsize parts of the nursery we have also finally begun to tend to propagation matters that have been neglected for too long. There are a number of fascinating new plants in the works.?
We still have our work cut out for us this summer with 90+ feet of 24 year old wooden plant benches that need to be deconstructed and rebuilt with metal as well as about 30 feet of shade structure that needs to be rebuilt as well. We greatly appreciate your patience and ongoing support as we tend to such essential matters.??

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Our Andean co-conspirator Matt Magee has a new online course: Revelations of the Soul. Anyone wanting to learn more about the behind the scenes working of cross cultural shamanism, hands on ceremonial techniques and the traditional knowledge of the Andes should sign up for Matt’s unique classes.? I know of no better teacher for deepening your eco-spiritual literacy. See: https://www.livingtheceremony.com/revelations-of-the-soul

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3/24 The past couple months I’ve been dealing with some unprecedented and difficult family matters that ambushed me and have demanded my full attention and time. We had hoped that (the admittedly arbitrary) turn of the new year would mean a shift from the steady stream of unpleasant stochastic events that had become the “malignant normalcy” of 2020 here. Unfortunately that has not been our experience so far. This means that during our winter shipping hiatus? we did not have the time to get caught up on essential projects as planned. In an attempt to try and continue to remedy this and find relative balance we are limiting the days we ship orders for the next couple months, quite possibly much longer.

Many nurseries operate seasonally and it now makes sense for us to adopt something similar. As mostly a one man show it is simply no longer viable for us to maintain shipping 5 days week year round as we have for the past 23+ years, so this is a trial period to see how it works for us. We are currently limiting the extent and frequency of shipping orders and will eventually settle on a more modest weekly/monthly schedule. Yet, we may be required to take significant time out this year to achieve our goals.?

We are also currently slow to answer email as we try and get back to a practical routine. We must ask you to bear with us right now. We will be back on track eventually. If the events of the past year have taught us anything it is to recognize our limitations and be flexible & receptive to change.?

After years of perpetually diversifying and expanding our catalog offerings we have come to a point where we have to consider some downsizing to return Sacred Succulents to a more manageable state of operation for us. To this end and to safeguard our decades of conservation work we have in recent years donated or distributed hundreds of rare and endangered plants to the UC Berkeley Botanical Gardens, the California Academy of Sciences, the Huntington Botanical Gardens, the Ventura Botanical Gardens, The Spheres, the UC Fullerton Greenhouses— to name a few organizations we have received very positive recognition from for our work & contributions. Thus, there are some of our catalog listings that will not be available again after this year. We will soon provide a list of these “last chance” plant offerings.

We are enacting and exploring these and other changes to protect the long term viability of Sacred Succulents, overcome sundry challenges of the past year and to be able to ultimately sustain an analogous level of customer service to what we maintained for over 20 years.?

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11/26/20? Sacred Succulents has always been a small family run business, for all practical purposes most of it has really been a one man show. Yet it is also a complex ever growing entity. For 23 years now a few thousand of you fine folks around the world have contributed to our existence and ongoing endeavors. There are no words we know that can fully express our deep and sincere gratitude for your support and enthusiasm over the years. We would not exist without you. Collectively we have introduced hundreds of new plants into cultivation, hopefully safeguarding some from extinction and cultural loss. And of course at the heart of our gratitude is the plants themselves–we are all truly blessed to be born of such a fecund world with an astounding diversity of vegetal wonders to nourish and flourish us.?

October and early November saw the hottest, driest early autumn in memory here in NorCal. The temperature dropped precipitously 2+ weeks ago causing some novel frost damage. We’ve never had a dry cold like this. We finally got real rain a week ago, greatly reducing (at least temporarily) the anxiety of wildfires possibly destroying our home and livelihood.

We are still in the process of deciding on how to best reconfigure aspects of how we do mail order so we can make it more manageable and functional in the face of ongoing calamities and climatic convulsions.?

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Our compadre Neil Logan, ethnobotanist and agroforester extraordinare, has helped develop a highly useful free online platform Agroforestry Design Tool? (see www.AgroforestryX.com ) With roots in the indigenous agricultural systems of Pacific Islands and tropical world, the Agroforestry Design Tool? helps you to customize an agroforest for a particular site and goals in an easy-to-follow framework. For an example of the AgorofestryX animation see: https://youtu.be/lvoG3nfQO_4

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We encourage everyone to sign up for the insightful, entertaining and important writing our friend and cultural historian Erik Davis is sharing through his blog The Burning Shore: https://erikdavis.substack.com/

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11/3/20? We just got word that our friend Richard Felger died on October 31. He was a giant in the world of ethnobotany and conservation, a poet and man of great heart. He left the world greatly enriched by his work and books, yet we can’t help feel the world is still a bit poorer without his presence… For more on Richard’s amazing work see – https://www.desertfoodplants.org/

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8/15/20? We are all feeling the strain of the pandemic as we watch the tide of human desire and will break upon the rocky shore of bio-physical reality. The current demands of just barely keeping our thousands of plants alive, orders packed & shipped and our daughters engaged & homeschooled has not afforded us space for anything else.?As we recalibrate aspects of the nursery and shipping schedules we hope to give our self more time for writing and research. We just added a few pieces to the Botanical Reflections page of the website; the first time we’ve updated this page in 9 years. Here you can find a smattering of our writing; childhood botanical musings, our floral assessment of a remote Incan site, bizarre genealogy, and pondering the fictions of taxonomy. We will post more eventually.

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With the current pandemic we are only making trips to the the post office 1-2 times a week, which means we are slow to both receive and ship orders right now.

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Here’s a link to the otherworldly images from the Microcosm project we contributed plant material to:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/slu-art-gallery/albums/72157713729253121?fbclid=IwAR1hcD5VN9kgrzBaJyT8OM9Ghpn2eCwwE5QOcpPQReRPTcRrcZUU2pxQbGo


Cavendishia grandifolia
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Greetings!
A small family run business, Sacred Succulents was founded in 1997, borne from our love of plants and a calling to the sacred duty of their conservation through propagation, dissemination and education. While our initial focus was succulents and xerophytes, our travels and the necessity of species conservation has us propagating a diverse cornucopia of unusual and wonderful beneficial plants from remote and immediate regions of our fecund planet. We strive toward maximizing biodiversity in our gardens and offerings. Widespread dispersal of plants along with propagation on an individual level is one of the most viable means of helping protect wild populations while assuring the evolutionary expansion of these botanical wonders.

We all have the strange grace to live in this time of climatic change and massive biological extinction recognized to be greater than anything the biosphere has experienced in 65 million years. Plant extinctions have been estimated at a loss of nearly 2 species a day. Along with this extinction is the loss of our collective human heritage, as the cultures, languages, dreams and songs that were intimately woven to those species disappear with them. Amongst thousands of known food plants, the world’s food supply relies on a scant dozen. We must do much more than save heirloom varieties and landraces of the major crops. We encourage you to relearn the forgotten indigenous foods and medicines of your region and of your lineage. Where habitat still exists, these are often disappearing from the fields and forests for lack of tending. Each and every one of us are co-creators of our ecosystems. Experiment with strange and rare edible plants, expand your palate. These are the seeds of true health and food security.

Whether you have a bright window in a city apartment, a suburban house with a yard, or access to acres of land, you can take part in the nurturing of endangered plants, propagate them and pass along the seeds, starts, attendant aspirations and ethnobotanical knowledge to friends. Realize the power we each have to assist our vanishing flora, acting as conservationists through a simple and joyful role as gardeners, horticulturalists, admirers of plants. These small endeavors help to put us in resonance with the viridian heartbeat of the biosphere, a reminder of earthly things like soil, weather and mooncycles in a world increasingly adrift in the navel gaze of cyberspace. Attention to seasonal gifts such as Spring flowers can refresh our wonder in the delicate fortitude of life in all its myriad forms. There is so much life and potential to celebrate all around us!

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Our coveted paper catalog is beautifully illustrated and full of ethnobotanical and horticultural information including detailed seed germination and propagation techniques. Some of what we offer:

  • Cacti– endangered?Ariocarpus,?Aztekium, Pelecyphora,?Turbinicarpus?species…?we have one of the most diverse selections of?Trichocereus?species including new hybrids and mutant San Pedros. We are involved with ongoing studies of this genus in South America: mapping distribution, ecology, ethnobotany and taxonomy through genetic analysis to aid preservation.
  • Other Succulents & Xerophytes–?Aloe,?rare and hardy?Agave?&?Yucca,?Baobabs & caudiciforms, aromatic?Bursera?(Copal, Palo Santo),?Commiphora?(Myrrh, Guggul) &?Boswellia?species (Frankincense), rare?Echeveria, a large selection of?Ephedra?species,?Hoodia gordonii,?medicinal?Peperomia,?uncommon Puya, obscure?Rhodiola?&?Sedum?species, Sceletium?tortuosum
  • Unusual & Rare Perennial Edible Plants–?Gaultheria, Vaccinium, Amelanchier, Lycium, Elaeagnus, Rubus, Ribes, Ugni, Agapetes?… Chufa, Capers, Ramps & rare?Alliums,?Rampion, Breadroot, Vigna subterranea?& edible bulbs, tubers, vines, fruit trees and more for adventurous gardeners, permaculturalists, and food forest fanatics.
  • Obscure Medicinals–?Codonopsis?species, Gold Root, Green tea, Honeybush & Rooibos, Maralroot, Mandrake, Sea Buckthorn, heirloom Tobacco, Yaupon, Yerba Mate,?Dioscorea,?Dan Shen & other Salvia species, Shatavari, Umckaloaba,?Silene capensis
  • Rare & Endangered Chilean Endemics–?Latua pubiflora,?Gomortega keule,?Desfontainia spinosa,?Ugni, Coriaria, Chilean Macnut,?Fabiana, Macqui Berry, Bell Flower, Nothofagus…and from the Juan Fernandez Archipelago- Dendroseris, Ochagavia elegans, Chenopodium sanctae-clarae, Nicotiana cordifolia, and more…
  • ?Andean Ethnobotanicals– From our annual expeditions. Ancient medicinals and species from one of the most imperiled forest ecosystems on the planet-?Polylepis, Buddleja, Hesperomeles, Alnus, Escallonia, Erythrina, Anadenanthera, Puya raimondii, Calceolaria, Macleania, Cavendishia, Pernettya, Bomarea,?Cypella, Phaedranassa, Stenomesson,?etc. Traditional Andean food plants- Caigua, Kaniwa & Quinoa, Tarwi, Aguaymanto,?Naranjilla, Tamarillo, Sauco Berries, Ulupica Pepper, Lacayote squash, Congona, Jaltomata, wild Tomatoes, Passiflora?and a large selection of heirloom tubers- Ajipa, Oca, Ulluco, Achira, Mashua, Mauka, Arracacha, Yacon, Maca.
  • ?Plants of California?–?a focus on forgotten feral foods like?Brodiaea, Calochortus, Triteleia, Lilium,?Yampah, Chia,?plus medicinals and endemic rarities.
  • ?A diversity of wild crafted seed from?South Africa, China, Himalayas?& other remote regions…?rock garden & alpine miniatures…and much more!
  • Books– Hard to find titles on ecological horticulture and ethnobotany.

We are not currently taking payment for our excessively lengthy & highly informative catalog. We are in the slow laborious process of updating it and do not currently have a functional hardcopy to mail. Our apologies to those who have sent payment in the past few months–we will eventually get you a copy!? For the time being you download the full PDFs of the various catalog sections at the top of this webpage.
Seed deliveries anywhere in the world.

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Sacred Succulents, PO Box 781, Sebastopol, CA 95473 USA
Email: sacredsucculents@hushmail.com
Please note: We do not have a mobile device and often only check our emails in the morning Monday through Friday,
so if you don’t get an immediate response from us–do not fret! We will?get back?to you.

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To Place an Order:
Yes, we are terribly old fashioned and do not take online payment.
We know it may be a stretch for some of you in this age of one click shopping, but to place an order you must do the following:
Print and fill out an order form, clearly listing botanical name and variety and mail with full payment (check, money order or cash, no credit cards) to:
Sacred Succulents, P.O. Box 781, Sebastopol, CA 95473 USA

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We do not have a retail store set up for on site shopping, but you?can arrange to pick up an order from our physical location in Occidental, CA
Email us your order and we can arrange a time for you to pick up (usually at least 2-3 days ahead) sacredsucculents@hushmail.com
Due to the pandemic there are no nursery tours or picking up orders for the foreseeable future. Mail order only!

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To receive our periodic (every 4-6 weeks) emails listing new plants & seeds, specials, news from our gardens, greenhouses & travels sign up at –
http://lists.sonic.net/mailman/listinfo/sacredsucculents

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Rare Plant and Seed List

Available by subscription. This is where you will find first offerings of exciting new plants that we have in quantities too small to list in our main catalog. One of a kind specimens, rarities and?introductions from our travels, and other plants and seeds from the far reaches of our wondrous fertile planet. Something unique for everyone! Cacti including uncommon?Trichocereus?and Ariocarpus?hybrids and specimens. Succulents such as rare?Bursera, Commiphora?and?Boswellia. Obscure medicinal herbs, unusual perennial foodcrops from around the world and selections from our Andean accessions. A fully descriptive list. A?must?for any serious plant collector, herbal horticulturalist and permaculture enthusiast.
Subscriptions are maxed out at this time–until further notice we are not taking new subscribers!

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Grafting Guide

Grafting of a slower growing species onto a faster growing stock increases plant growth significantly. It is a viable means of quickly producing mature specimens for seed production and vegetative propagation. This illustrated guide covers all aspects of grafting, from week old seedlings to mature specimens. Includes tricks we have learned over the years that help make this valuable conservation technique accessible and practical. Focuses mainly on Cactaceae but coverage is given to Euphorbiaceae, Apocynaceae and other succulent families.
$9.00 postage paid USA, inquire for foreign postage

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Public Domain Pledge

An important terms of business note to all our customers:
In order to be in line with our mission to support the preservation of botanical biodiversity, following the lead of J.L. Hudson Seeds?and in recognition that the biodiversity of the Earth is the common heritage of all life,?all of our seed and plant offerings are now Public Domain. This means that all plants and seeds are supplied solely under the following conditions: We expressly prohibit the use of any seeds or plants supplied by us, or their progeny, in any form of genetic engineering, breeding, or research which will result in?any?form of life patent, variety protection, trademarks, breeder’s rights or any form of intellectual property applied to living things which would compromise the Public Domain status of the seeds, plants, their progeny and any genetic material therein. We expressly prohibit the transfer to any third party of any seeds, plants, their progeny or any portion of their genetic material without these prohibitions in place. Commercial propagation is encouraged, but in the unlikely event that large-scale commercial distribution is achieved, benefit-sharing along the path towards the source, in accordance with the spirit of the International Convention on Biological Diversity, will be undertaken. Thank you for your understanding and support!

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We believe the biological diversity of the world is a common inheritance shared by all and the right to having a personal individual relationship with the myriad life forms of the planet is intrinsic to that. It is the very fibers that weave us.

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((((((((( Plant seeds. Plant lots of seeds. Plant them without fear. Plant them with love. )))))))))

We must look for help not so much to the stamen counters as to the plants themselves.” – Luther Burbank

?“The greatest service which can be rendered any country is to add a useful plant to its culture” – Thomas Jefferson

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GIFT CERTIFICATES are available for any amount, please inquire


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Sixth Mini Plant Auction Fundraiser

(Plants are available to US customers only)

Auction Closed!

The auction closed at 6:00 pm PST Sunday, October 3, 2021

This is a unique chance to obtain new introductions, rarities, specimens and mother plants. This is a one time offer for most of these plants–they will not be available again!
? ? Know that auction purchases will directly fund nursery repairs; constructing new nursery benches and rebuilding several shade structures, ongoing tech upgrades as well as our continual research and conservation work.

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Bidding process is the same as last auction & simplified from early auctions.
With this auction what you bid is exactly what you will pay if you have the winning high bid when the auction ends. This differs from our first four auctions where the high bid was hidden and determined to be just $1 over the previous bidders high bid.
For example for the current auction: If the current bid on a plant is $35 and you bid $50 the high bid price is then moved to $50 (NOT $36 like the earlier auctions) and the next bidder has to bid over that ($51 or more) — if you have the highest bid when the auction closes then you win that plant and your high bid is exactly what you pay (plus shipping).

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To place a bid- ( please read fully before bidding! )

Email us ( benkamm@monitor.net ) with “SS auction” in the subject header.
In the body of the email list –
? ?1) The name of each plant you are bidding on with the amount you are bidding next to the name (must be equal to or greater than the “minimum starting bid” or current “high bid”).
? ?2) Your full name and complete shipping address.

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Placing a bid is binding, so please do not bid unless you are committed to buying! Again please do not bid if you are not 100% committed and do not bid beyond your means.

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We honor the email bids as first come first serve, so if we don’t respond right away—do not worry, we will honor your bid in the order it was received! The auction will be updated at least once a day by 6 pm, more often the final day. Towards the end of the auction can get hectic and we may not be able to notify you in a timely manner if you’ve been outbid during this last phase–we recommend checking the website periodically to see the current high bids.
The auction closes 6:00 pm PST Sunday, October 3. You will be contacted by email that evening or the following morning for the auction plants you have won. Our regular shipping costs apply. Placing a bid is binding, so please do not bid unless you are committed to buying! Payment (cash, check, or money order) will need to be sent promptly on Monday, October 4. Your plants will be shipped after payment is received.

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Shipping and Handling for Auction Plants
First class priority mail = $10.00 for the first plant $2 each additional plant. Express mail = Inquire for current costs
*Plants marked with a single asterisk are large, heavy and have special shipping charges = $16.00 for the first plant $2 each additional plant.
**Plants marked with double asterisk are extra large and/or heavy. We charge you the actual USPS postage cost plus an $6 handling fee on the total order. Please note: Shipping costs for these will be significant for folks in eastern states (for example a 36” Trichocereus sent to the East Coast would be around $40-50+ shipping but less than half that for the West Coast). You may inquire the approximate shipping cost by emailing us your zipcode.
California residents add 7.25% sales tax. Sonoma county residents 8%.
Sacred Succulents, P.O. Box 781, Sebastopol, CA 95473 USA

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Auction Plants

Auction is now closed!

Cactaceae

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Other Succulents and Xerophytes

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Boswellia carteri (= Boswellia sacra) “ Frankincense”

Burseraceae. Small pachycaul tree to 25′ with pinnately compound leaves and racemes of small white pink flowers. B. carteri is basically a geographical form of the taxonomically recognized B. sacra. Dried sap from the tree is an ancient incense widely revered since the dawn of civilization, often in combination with myrrh. Z10b
4″+ treelet 2+ years old – 5 bids $81

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Echeveria saltensis Pino et al 3015

Crassulaceae. Succulent rosettes of olive to lavender or even reddish to brown leaves. Salmon colored flowers. Growing on slate outcrops with Deuterocohnia sp., Alemania, Guachipas Dept., Salta Prov., Argentina, 4200′. Newly discovered; there had been rumors of this plant for some years and we tried to track it down in 2015 to no avail. G. Pino and colleagues were finally able to locate specimens for description in late 2018. This is the very first plant of this striking species to be introduced into US cultivation! ?Z9b?
2″+ plant 2+ years old – 5 bids $80

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Andean Ethnobotanicals

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~ end of mini auction list~

Thank you for your support!

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November Specimen Plant Offerings

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We are going to do our best to update this section monthly- by the second week of each month. So check back!

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(Orders can be combined with other items and plants)
?USA customers only. Most of these plants are one-of-a-kind and have been in our collection for many years. This is a one time offer for most of these plants–they will not be available again! If you are interested in purchasing a plant please email first to confirm availability- sacredsucculents@hushmail.com or benkamm@monitor.net- please provide your full mailing address in the email.

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Shipping and Handling for?Specimen Plants
First class priority mail = $10.00 for the first plant $2 each additional plant. Express mail = Inquire for current costs
*Plants marked with a single asterisk are large, heavy and have special shipping charges = $16.00 for the first plant $2 each additional plant.
**Plants marked with double asterisk are extra large and/or heavy. We charge you the actual USPS postage cost plus an $6 handling fee on the total order. Please note: Shipping costs for these will be significant for folks in eastern states (for example a 36″ Trichocereus sent to the East Coast would be around $40+ shipping but less than half that for the West Coast). You may inquire the approximate shipping cost by emailing us your zipcode.
?***Plants available for pick up-by appointment – at our home in Occidental. Please email?to reserve plants and arrange pick up.
For those further away, we will consider shipping, but the plants will need to be cut into smaller sizes- email for shipping quotes.
California residents add 7.25% sales tax. Sonoma county residents 8.25%.
Download Order Form

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Cactaceae

Unless noted otherwise only 1 plant of each listing is available!

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Borzicactus ventimigliae NL042108a (previously offered as B. leonensis?)

Shrubby columnar cactus with deep green stems to 5’+. Nicely sculptured tuberculate ribs and red-black spines turn gray with age. Red tubular flowers, edible fruit. Seed collected by ethnobotanist N. Logan near Cuenca, Ecuador. A really beautiful species rarely seen in captivity. Previously mis-identified and offered as B. leonensis. Thanks to Tristan Davis for identification on this. Z9b
2? ~? 3-4″+ plants 2+ years old $12.50 each

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Cleistocactus buchtienii??“Kitisira”

Slender cylindrical stems to 6’. Orange-brown to whitish spines, fine and needle-like. Pale red tubular flowers. Small edible fruit. Central Bolivia. Around Cochabamba stems of this cactus are the preferred source for making “llujta” a regional kind of llipta for chewing with coca leaves. Naturally dead and dried stems are collected, ones with white rather than orangish spines are said to be superior. These are then burned and the resulting ash mixed with a little cooked potato starch and formed into cylinders to dry. A small amount of this is chewed with coca leaves to facilitate their beneficial stimulating properties. Easily grown species. Z9a? 2 ~ 12–15″+ branched plants 4+ years old $19.50*

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Corryocactus brevistylus BK09424.1 “Sanky”

Attractive Trichocereus peruvianus-like columnar cactus from southern Peru. Stems 10–20′ tall, spines up to 9″ long! Yellow tubular flowers and softball size fruit. Fruit purchased at one of the large traditional markets in Lima city, Peru. The flesh of the huge fruit is amazingly sour, as acidic as a lemon. Considered a liver and kidney tonic. We blended the pulp with a little honey-water to make a delicious and refreshing sanky-ade. More tolerant of cold and aridity than any lemon tree, could substitute in areas where lemons can’t grow. Z9a?
4? ~? 3–5″+ plants 2+ years old $14.50 each

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Corryocactus sp. BK14516.19

Thin bright green cylindrical stems 12 to 24”+. Small white-gray spines clothe the 7+ ribs. Orange flowers, 1/2”+ green fruit with a white kiwi-flavored pulp. Growing on the cliff edge overlooking the Apurimac, Capuliyoc Pass, Cusco Dept., Peru, 9800’. First offering of seedlings. Z9a/b
2? ~? 6-12″+ plants 2-3 years old $14.50 each or 2 for $25

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Echinopsis ‘Haku-Jo’

Mutant cultivar that was selected in Japan. Dark green clustering stems to 8”+. Medium spines, felty white bands on the upper edge of the ribs between the areoles gives the plant a distinct striped appearance. Delightful. Scented tubular white flowers. Z9a?
1 ~ 2-4″+ plant $12.50

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Ferocactus glaucescens “Visnaga”

Barrell cactus with green to blue stems to 24″. Yellow spines and metallic-yellow flowers. Hidalgo, Mexico. The seed is from our spineless mother plants (f. inermis), the seedlings are spiny so far but may lose their spines as they mature. Easy to grow. Z10a
6? ~? 1″+ plants 2 years old $8.50 each or 2 for $14

F. glaucescens f. inermis 3 mothers

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Frailea castanea

Small round stem to 1″+. Depressed center, purple-green skin. Tiny insignificant spines hug the indistinct ribs. Shiny yellow flowers. Native to Uruguay and Brazil. Amongst the cutest of cacti and easy to grow. Z10a
2? ~? 1″+ plants 3 years old $12.50 each

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Mammillaria craigii TL497 “Wichuri” “Witculiki” “Peyote de San Pedro”

Globular pincushion cactus to 6″ in diameter. Blue-green body made up of a multitude of rounded tubercles tipped with stout spines to 1″ long. Abundant white fuzz at the center of the plant and in between the tubercles. Dark pink-purple flowers borne in rings in early summer. Oozes a milky white latex if punctured. Mexican species highly respected by the Tarahumara. The roasted center is squeezed into the ear to relieve earaches, headaches and deafness. Used as a stimulant by runners and well trained shamans for “dreaming”. Easy to grow. Z9a
2? ~? 1-2″+ plants 2+ years old $18.50 each

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Neowerdermannia vorwerkii “Achacana”

Spherical cactus to about 4″ diameter with dark green triangular tubercles. Curved spines, lilac-pink flowers and reddish fruit. Distributed from the altiplano of Bolivia to northern Argentina, from 10,000–13,000’+. The whole cactus is considered a kind of potato, it is gathered by the tens of thousands each summer, skinned, cooked and eaten. It is said to be very tasty and is a significant source of vitamin K, calcium and zinc. The pulp is also a remedy for stomach ailments and made into a drink for kidney and liver disease. There is some concern that harvesting may endanger the plant, but it has yet to be clarified how wild populations are impacted. Well worth cultivating as an unusual food plant. Needs strong light and gritty soil. Z7a or below.
1? ~? 1″+ plant 2-3 years old $18.50?

Mother plant

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Puna bonnieae

Small geophytic cactus, clusters of gray-green round stems to 1″ arising from tuberous roots. Tiny red brown spines hug the body of the plant. Large pink flowers. This charming opuntiod, which resembles a cluster of miniature soccer balls, was first discovered in 1990 above 6,000′ near Loro Huasi, Tinogasta, Catamarca, Argentina. Well draining soil and seems to be frost tolerant if kept moderately dry. Quite rare in captivity. Rooted cuts. Z8b/9a
1? ~? 1″+ plant with 4-5 heads $28.50

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Pygmaeocereus bieblii

Pygmy clustering stems 1–3″ tall. Corky spines hug the spiral ribs. Sweet scented, white tubular flowers, like tiny Trichocereus blossoms. Endemic to the dry western Andean slopes of Ancash, Peru between 2–6000′. The most diminutive/desirable species in the Trichocereae tribe. A coveted favorite. Z9b
1? ~? 0.75″+ plant 2-3 years old $16.50

Mother plants

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Trichocereus bridgesii ‘Cuatro Vientos’

There are many myths in the Andes about the “cactus of the 4 winds”, a special 4 ribbed plant. T. bridgesii is one of the few species that occasionally produces stems with just 4 ribs. We regularly get requests for such cuts and offer one here from a long spined seed grown plant. Will eventually revert to 5 or more ribs. Z9a
1 ~ 10”+ rooted cutting $60* SOLD

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Trichocereus bridgesii ‘Lotusland’ “Melted Wax Cactus”

A great clone from Lotusland Garden in Santa Barbara, CA. Often grows monstrose stems with a melted wax look.
2 ~ 10-12″ cuts $38.50* each

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Trichocereus bridgesii f. cristata

A few years ago an unusual growth of crested tissue appeared on a specimen of this already monstrose plant. Mostly spineless blue-green tissue in thin or rounded ridges, sometimes resembling a cresting wave. We offer a very limited number of rooted cuttings. Get one of these larger sizes while you can!
1? ~? 5.5″ tall by 5.5″ wide plant $75
1? ~? 2.5″ tall by 4.5″ wide plant $48

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Trichocereus bridgesii f. monstrosus cl. A “Achuma”

Virtually spineless. Smooth blue-green stems with 2–4 indistinct ribs. Occasionally produces yellow spines up to 3″ long. Plants eventually form candelabra like stands. Individual stems can grow to be remarkably phallic and this clone is referred to as the “penis cactus.”
1? ~? 11-12″+ cutting $38.50*
2? ~? 26-28″+ rooted cuttings with several joints, grown hard $85** each
1? ~? 19″+ cutting $58.50**

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Trichocereus bridgesii f. monstrosus cl. B?“Achuma”

2–5 ribs initially bearing 3″ yellow spines then becoming smooth and spineless. The stems reach 4–6″ in length then stop growing and begin to offset. Eventually forms dense stands to 6′ tall made up of hundreds of small multi-branched stems. Rooted cuts.
1? ~? 5-6″ tall by 5-6″ wide rooted cuttings with 6-8 stems $36.50* SOLD

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Trichocereus bridgesii X Trichocereus ‘huarazensis’/scopulicola?

Another beautiful new hybrid of desirable species. So far the seedlings look like short to medium spined bridgesii with interesting skin. First offering.
1? ~? 2.5–3″ plant 2+ years old $22.50

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Trichocereus crassiarboreus X Trichocereus pachanoi OST90641

Our T. crassiarboreus mothers were grown from European seed stock– an obscure plant, supposedly a synonym for Weberbauerocereus cuzcoensis, but our plants look intermediate to T. pachanoi and cuzcoensis. Crossed with Ostaloza’s robust wild pachanoi. New hybrid.
3? ~? 2.5–3.5″ plant 2+ years old $17.50 each

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Trichocereus grandiflorus X Trichocereus pallarensis

Brand new hybrid. The red flowered clumping T. grandiflorus crossed with the rare pachanoid T. pallarensis. So far the seedlings favor the mother’s traits, some show variegation. Should develop into very unique plants. First offering–non variegated seedlings. Z8/9?
2? ~? 2-3″+ plants 2 years old $16.50 each

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Trichocereus sp. ‘Juul’s Giant’/T. pachanoi ‘Huancabamba’ hybrid X T. peruvianus ‘Barracuda’

New hybrid. Spiny fat babies.
2 ~ 3″+ plants 3 years old $18.50 each

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Trichocereus sp. ‘Kimura’s Giant’ X Trichocereus sp. ‘Juul’s Giant’

Exciting new hybrid of these two robust and coveted species.?
2 ~ 3″+ plants 2-3 years old $26.50 each SOLD

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Trichocereus pachanoi Hutchison 1597 “San Pedro” “Huachuma”

Thick upright stems, medium spines, large flowers. Old Hutchison collection from Huancabamba, Piura, Peru, 8400′. Very rarely offered.
2 ~ 7–8″ cuts $36.50 each
2 ~ 9–10″+ cuts $44.50 each
1 ~ 12″+ cut $52.50*
1 ~ 15″+ cut $66.50* SOLD

Trichocereus pachanoi Kimnach et al. 2876D “San Pedro” “Huachuma”

Wild San Pedro, fat rounded ribs and 1/4–1″+ spines, white flowers. Collected along the Cajamarca to Namora road, Cajamarca Dept., north Peru. Z9a
1? ~? 16″+ cutting $52.50*

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Trichocereus pachanoi ‘Lima’? “San Pedro”

Upright blue-green stems to 15’+. Rounded smooth ribs. The plants we grow in full sun relatively small spines, interestingly the plants we grow in the filtered light of our greenhouse have larger spines: 1/4–1/2″. White flowers. This is one of the clones planted as an ornamental throughout the sprawling metropolis of Lima, Peru. Very similar to ‘Ogunbodode’ when grown in full sun for us, interestingly when grown in the light shade of our greenhouse the plant consistently produces slightly larger spines–the exact opposite of many other clones. Surely one of the more attractive San Pedros. In high demand and now mostly limited to our plant auctions, we currently have some extra cuts.?
1? ~? 5-6″ cut $55 SOLD
1? ~? 30″+? long 3″+diameter cutting $300**SOLD

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Trichocereus pachanoi ‘Ogunbodede’s Matucana’?

Upright rounded stems with small spines. Reportedly from Matucana, Lima, Peru where we have observed a few?T. pachanoi planted around the town. This is the clone that stood out in Ogunbodede’s study. Only available in very limited quantity each year. The demand has been absurd and we’ve only had enough to offer through our email auctions the past couple years. We currently have a couple 5-6″ cuttings that we will consider offers on now. (Folks have been offering $160-300+ for these but we’ll consider any offer.) Larger cuts will be posted on a future auction.

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Trichocereus aff. pachanoi BK10508.1 “San Pedro”

Upright columns to 10’+, small spines. Often produces 4 ribbed stems. Common clone around Cochabamba City, Bolivia. Looks distinct from the T. pachanoi of Peru/Ecuador, though local botanists refer to it as T. pachanoi. Possibly brought to the region during the Incan colonization of the area in the 1400s. Our collection from the base of Cerro San Pedro, about 1 mile from the Martin Cardenas Botanical Garden, near 8,500’. Z9a
1? ~? 12″+ rooted cutting $60*

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Trichocereus aff. pachanoi BK10512.11 “K’ulala” “San Pedro”

One of our favorites. Upright columns to 10′, dark green glossy stems 4–6″ diameter. Distinct large white areoles, small spines to 1/4″. T. pachanoi like, but distinct from other clones we’ve seen. Planted at a home near Cuchucunata, Cochabamba, Bolivia, 8,250′. The owners call it “k’ulala”. Z9a
1? ~? 5″+ cutting $28.50 SOLD
1? ~? 26″+ cutting $145**SOLD

Mother in habitat

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Trichocereus aff. pachanoi Hutchison et al 6212 “San Pedro” “Huachuma”

Upright stems to 8’+ tall and 6″ in diameter. 5–9 fat, rounded ribs and miniature spines. Sweet night blooming white flowers. A really gorgeous San Pedro that is most likely simply a distinct clone of wild T. pachanoi. Originally collected above 8,000′ by P. Hutchison and J.K. Wright & R.M. Straw in the Canyon Rio Maranon above Chagual, just below Aricapampa, Huamachuco Prov., La Libertad Dept., Peru.
1? ~? 7″+ cut $22.50 SOLD

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Trichocereus pachanoi f. cristata/monstrosus?

We have 2 distinct and highly unusual mutant clones of this favorite cactus. Please note that the cristate cuttings grow slower than the monstrose and all have the potential to change from one to another and occasionally revert to normal columns. Z9a
Trichocereus pachanoi f. monstrosus cl. A
1? ~? 12″cutting $27.50*

Trichocereus pachanoi f. monstrosus cl. B
1? ~? 12″ cutting $27.50*?

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Trichocereus pachanoi f. monstrosus X Trichocereus peruvianus ‘Serra Blue’

New and very interesting hybrid. About 50% of the seedlings express mutant growth so far. Fat blue-green stems, medium spines.
1? ~? 4″+ plant 4+ years old $19.50?
1? ~? 12″+ with 1″ pup 4+ years old $45.50*

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Trichocereus pachanoi X Trichocereus pasacana

Very cool new hybrid of San Pedro with the giant T. pasacana— we look forward to the unique mature form. Z8/9?
2? ~? 1.5–2″+ plants 2-3 years old $16.50 each

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Trichocereus pallarensis X Trichocereus bridgesii

Diverse hybrid that varies from short to long slender spines. The last of these blue-blushed seed grown beauties we have, long spines 3/4 -2″.
1 ~ 18″+ plant 9 years old? $76**

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Trichocereus pasacana BK151014.1 “Pasacana” “Cardon Santos”

Massive tree like species. The stems grow up to 1.5’+ thick and branch from near the base. 15–35 ribs covered in numerous dense white or yellow spines up to several inches long. 5” white day blooming flowers, followed by edible fruits known as “Pasacana.” Our seed collection from a robust large population of this giant to 25′ with a diversity of spination. Near Volcan, Jujuy, Argentina, 7000′. Considered a “holy” cactus. Ashes of the fruits, seeds and flowers are known to be used in special “llipta” mixtures, lime preparations that are chewed with coca (Erythroxylum species) leaves.
3? ~? 2.5″+ diameter plant 4+ years old $14.50 each

Wild T. pasacana, northern Argentina

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Trichocereus pasacana BK151014.9?“Pasacana” “Cardon Santos”

Fat specimens to 20′ bristling with long stout spines, large white blossoms. Near the Incan outpost of Tilcara, Jujuy, Argentina, 8000′. Z8a?
4? ~? 1.5–2″+ diameter plants 2+ years old $12.50 each or 2 for $22

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Trichocereus peruvianus ‘Osmo’ X Trichocereus bridgesii ‘Reynolds’

Nice new hybrid with bluish spiny stems.
2? ~? 3–4″+ plant 2+ years old $16.50 each

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Trichocereus peruvianus X Trichocereus huanucoensis

Another hopeful hybrid that produces fat, robust, blue-green plants.
2? ~? 5–7″+ plants 3+ years old $19.50 each

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Trichocereus peruvianus X Trichocereus sp. ‘Juul’s Giant’ hybrid f. monstrosus

In 1996 we sowed 1000+ seed of this great hybrid. One seedling grew to be a real jewel, with fat blue-green mutant stems with 8–16 ribs and occasionally thick fans of cristate growth. The blossoms on this clone are extra large and also mutant, with many extra sepals and petals!
1? ~? 7″ rooted cuttings $24.50?

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Trichocereus peruvianus X Trichocereus sp. ‘Juul’s Giant’ hybrid f. cristata

Same clone as above, these are rooted cuts of beautiful thick fans of blue-green cristate growth with 1/2″ spines. 3–4″+ rooted cutting
1? ~? 8″+ long rooted cutting $39.50

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Trichocereus peruvianus ‘Serra Blue’ X T. pachanoi f. monstrosus

This new hybrid is a bit faster growing than it’s sister cross, about 25% of the seedlings express mutant growth so far. Beautiful bluish plants with medium spines.
2? ~? 3-5″+ plants 4+ years old $19.50 each

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Trichocereus riomizquensis BK10512.1? “Achuma”

Upright stands to 10’+ tall. 2–5″ diameter stems with green to blue-green to yellow-green epidermis. 4–7 radial spines with 1–3 central spines to 3″ long. Looks to be a distinct spiny form of T. bridgesii. Growing on a steep hillside next to a home at the entrance to the town of Totora, Cochabamba, Bolivia, 9,000′. Growing with Buddleja tucumanensis, Carica quercifolia, and Asteraceae. Local women call it “achuma” and use it externally to treat fever. No one knew where it grew wild. We searched where Ritter first described the plant at Chujllas, and along the Rio Mizque, adjacent valleys and slopes, but never found a single wild plant, only herds of feral goats.? Inquire for other clones. Z9a
2? ~? 5-6″+ cutting $28.50 each SOLD

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Trichocereus riomizquensis BK10512.4 “Achuma”

Upright stands to 10’+ tall. 2–5″ diameter stems with green to blue-green to yellow-green epidermis. 4–7 radial spines with 1–3 central spines to 3″ long. Large stand growing on embankment near a creek and across from the school, Totora, Cochabamba, Bolivia. Growing with Tripodanthus acutifolius, Schinus molle, and an unidentified vine, 8,900′. Z9a
1 ~ 5–6″+ cutting $28.50?

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Trichocereus terscheckii X Trichocereus ??

Open pollinated hybrid, the father skipped town before paternity could be determined! It’s up to us to raise the kids. By the look of the spination we suspect T. taquimbalensis or one of it’s close kin may be the dead beat dad. Z8a
1? ~? 3″+ plant 4+ years old $26.50

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Trichocereus shaferi X Echinopsis inermis

New hybrid, should produce interesting clustering plants. So far the seedlings look like small Echinopsis. First offering. Z8/9?
2? ~? 1-2″+ plants 2+ years old $12.50 each

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Trichocereus sp. SS02 (=Trichocereus bridgesii)

Dense candelabra stands to 16′ tall. Blue-gray/green frosted stems up to 5″ in diameter with 5–7 ribs. Each areole bears 2–4 central spines up to 1.5″ long. White nocturnal flowers. The new growth on old stems is often spineless. A distinct form of Trichocereus bridgesii. Z9a
1? ~? 22″+ cutting $75** SOLD

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Turbinicarpus pseudomacrochele

A small globose-cylindrical plant with rounded tubercles tipped with wavy bristle like yellow spines. Large pink flowers. Occurs only in the rocky terrain of a few small hills within the states of Queretaro and Hidalgo. Known as one of the false “peyote”. Cultivation is critical as this plant is threatened with extinction in habitat. Z9b
1? ~? 1″+ plant 3–4 years old $12.50

Mother plant

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Other Succulents & Xerophytes

Unless noted otherwise only 1 plant of each listing is available!

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Abromeitiella lotteae

Bromeliaceae. Little 1–2″ rosettes of small triangular leaves, green with silver-gray flecking. Will eventually form large dense mounds to several feet across. Small tubular wine-red flowers with green tips. This rare red flowered species from southern Bolivia is exceedingly scarce in cultivation. The recent popular trend in genetic studies is to lump Abromeitiella into the genus Deuterocohnia, but there is plenty of valid reason to keep this unique genus intact. Nice clusters with many heads. Z9b?
2? ~? 4″+ clustered plants 4+ years old $29.50 each

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Agave albopilosa

Agavaceae. A recently described species that is totally unique within the genus. Solitary porcupine rosettes to 1′ high and 20″ across. Slender recurved green leaves. Mature plants develop a fringe of white hairs surrounding the black spine at the tip of each leaf. Endemic to Huasteca Canyon, Nuevo Leon, Mexico, 3000–4500′. Grows in a humid locale on very steep canyons walls that only get a few hours of direct sun each day. Well draining substrate, regular water, and some shade will encourage it to thrive. Exceedingly rare. Z7b?
2? ~? 2″ plants $26.50 each

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Agave ovatifolia “Noga” “Whale’s Tongue Agave”

A newish and highly desirable species. Dense, rounded, solitary rosette 3–6’ across and 2–5’ tall with short, broad, lightly cupped leaves, an amazing glaucus silver-blue color. Inflorescence up to 14’ tall with green-yellow flowers. Endemic to a small area of mountains in Nuevo Leon, Mexico, between 3,700–7,000’. One of the most beautiful of all Agave! Tolerant of both drought and cold. Well suited to temperate climates. Protect young plants from hard frost. A couple very fine older specimens. Z7b
2? ~? 10–12”+ plants 7+ years old $32.50* each

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Beaucarnea sanctomariana “Santa Maria Ponytail Palm”

Agavaceae. Branching caudiciform tree 12–24′ tall. The conical swollen trunk can reach 5′ across and has thick brown-gray bark with a rectangular to polyhedral pattern. The elongated slender branches are crowned with spherical rosettes of recurved, bright green, grass like leaves to 2.5′ long. Branched inflorescence to 3′ with many small cream-yellow flowers. This newly described endangered species is a microendemic of rocky outcrops in the deciduous dry forest of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Oaxaca, Mexico. A rare chance for a superb specimen of the coveted caudiciform. Z10a
1? ~? 14″+ plant with 4″+ caudex 8-9 years old $66*

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Bursera fagaroides “Copal”

Burseraceae. A really wonderful plant. Shrub or small tree to 20′. Thick swollen trunks and limbs with smooth golden bark that exfoliates in thin papery sheets. Pinnate leaves, tiny flowers followed by purple green berries. Widespread throughout the Sonoran and Chihuahuan deserts of Mexico. The sap is the most common source of Copal, highly aromatic with a sweet citrus like scent. Dormant much of the year, leafing out only with the onset of hot weather. They defoliate in Autumn with an attractive display as the leaves change to yellow, orange and red. Z10a?
1? ~? 24″+ treelet with 1/2″ diameter trunk 4+ years old $32.50*

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Bursera odorata “Torote Blanco” “Copal”

One of the smaller Copal species, usually a dwarf tree under 10′. Swollen caudiciform trunk with golden peeling bark. Pinnate leaves, small yellow flowers. Mountain to coastal dry forest, Baja and mainland Mexico. The sap is very aromatic with a sweet-balsam odor. Z10a
1? ~? 18″+ treelet 3+ years old $26.50

Trunk of mother plant

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Bursera silviae

Newer species. Small caudiciform tree to 20′. Minimally peeling green to yellowish bark, leaves made up of 3–7 oblong leaflets. The sap is intensely aromatic. Recently described from coastal Oaxaca, Mexico. Related to B. fagaroides. Rooted cuts from several clones. Plants are currently winter dormant. Z10a
1 ~ 9″+ treelet $26.50

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Carica pubescens BK08522.5 (=Vasconsellea pubescens) “Andean Papaya” “Chamburo”

Caricaceae. Pachycaul tree 8-16″+. Bottle shaped, caudex like trunk to 20″+ diameter. Very attractive digitate leaves crown the trunk. Edible and sweet papaya fruit to 6” borne along the upper trunk and turning yellow/orange when ripe. Seed collected from Ollantaytambo, Cusco Dept., Peru, 9300′. The green fruit are cooked as a vegetable. Probably the hardiest of the sweet papayas. One of the parent of the ‘Babaco’ hybrid cultivars grown throughout South America. Fruits surprisingly well here in northern California in areas of mild frost. Folks are always shocked to find you can grow papayas here. Protect plants from freezing when young. Highly drought tolerant, though dislikes prolonged excessive heat. Can be bonsaid and grown like a caudiciform succulent. Z9a/b
4? ~? 8-10″+ treelets 2 years old $19.50 each or 2 for $33

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Dermobotrys saundersii

Scrophulariaceae. Epiphytic, multibranched, pachycaul shrublet to 2–3′. Semi succulent leaves. A profusion of 2″+ pendant tubular red flowers with yellow interiors adorn the branch ends. 1.5″+ ovate shaped edible green berries with delicious fruity figgy pulp. Endangered species from the dry coastal forests of South Africa and Madagascar. This unique species does well for us grown in 50% pumice in partial shade and treated like a succulent. Z9b/10a
2? ~? 5-8″ plants 3 years old $16.50 each

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Dyckia choristaminea X Dyckia remotiflora

Bromeliaceae. Our first Dyckia hybrid! A dwarf with clusters of 1–3″ rosettes. Very slender recurved leaves with silver striations along their length. Nearly smooth margins with tiny insignificant thorns. Relatively slow growing. Intense dark yellow flowers. First time offering of this diminutive beauty, should be quite hardy. Z8a/b?
2 ~ 2″+ plants 5 years old $18.50 each

Mother plant

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Dyckia lanata

Clusters of thick rosettes. Recurved leaves heavily frosted with silver and white. Flowers unseen. We can find no information to confirm if this is a valid species. All we know is the seed came from “South America.” Whatever the taxonomy the plant is decidedly gorgeous. Z9b?
1? ~? 3″+ plant 3–4 years old $16.50

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Echeveria ballsii

Crassulaceae. Short stemmed, clustering rosettes of slender dark green leaves with red-purple margins and speckles. Peach-red flowers with yellow interior. This rare species from the cloudforests of Columbia was thought to be extinct in the wild until recently rediscovered. This clone collected by Robert Wellens, Masquera, Cundimarcana, Columbia. Prefers a bright, cool environment. Z9b
4? ~? 2–3″+ plants $12.50 each or 2 for $21

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Echeveria chilonensis BB004.18

Clustering rosettes of oblanceolate leaves on stems to 5″ high. The plant is an olive-green to grey color with a reddish-purple blush. Pale yellow flowers. Very rare beautiful Bolivian species from the mountains of Betanzos, Potosi Dept. New to cultivation. Z9a–b
3? ~? 2.5–3″+ plants $15.50 each or 2 for $26

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Erythrina flabelliformis?‘Skeleton Canyon’ “Chilicote” Colorin”

Fabaceae. Pachycaul tree 10–30’+. Smooth grey bark with striations of white and green. Deciduous trifoliate leaves and spined stems. Many flowered racemes of brilliant bright red flowers in the Spring. Red to orange or yellow seeds. Restricted areas of southern Arizona, new Mexico and remnant dry forest throughout northern Mexico and Baja. Seed from Skeleton Canyon, Hidalgo Co., NM. The seeds are often used in jewelry, though they are quite toxic. Small amounts are used medicinally. There is speculation that the seeds may have once been used as a psychoactive additive to maize beers by the Chiricahua Apache. Z9b/10a
2? ~? 6″ plants 1-2 years old $14.50 each

Erythrina flabelliformis ‘Santa Rita Mountains’

Seed from the biodiverse Santa Rita Mountains, Arizona.?
2? ~? 6″ plants 1-2 years old $14.50 each

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Erythrina herbacea “Cherokee Bean” “Coral Bean”

Herbaceous caudiciform shrub to 4′ though reported up to 16′ in frost free areas. Tripartate leaves with arrowhead-shaped leaflets. Large spires of dark red tubular flowers. Bean-like red seeds. Native to the southeastern USA and northeastern Mexico. The plant is rich in toxic alkaloids and was used medicinally throughout its range for everything from rheumatism to digestive aid and general tonic to rat and fish poison. In some parts of Mexico the flowers are added to soups and said to be mildly narcotic. Easy to grow, drought tolerant. Z7b
3? ~? 6″ plants 1-2 years old $15.50 each

Mature plant in bloom

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Furcraea longaeva

Agavaceae. Yucca/Agave relative from central Mexico with rosettes of deep green to blue green sword like leaves. Eventually forms a trunk to 6′ tall. The branched inflorescence can reach over 40′ tall! The largest of the genus. Rarely offered. Z9b
1? ~? 24”+ tall plant 8 years old $64.50**

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Ipomoea albivenea

Convolvulaceae. Attractive South African morning glory that develops a fat gray pachycaul trunk. Thick gray vines arise from the top of the trunk bearing felty silver green heart shaped leaves and 3–4″ white, night blooming flowers with pale pink or yellow throats. Native to Kwazulu-Natal and the old Transvaal provinces. Easy to sprout, just nick and soak the seed. Needs a large deep container for the thick tuberous roots and the soil mix should have excellent drainage. The vines can be trellised and tend to be perennial if kept above 50° F. Z10a–b
2? ~? Plants 2+ years old $15.50 each

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Ipomoea capillacea RM51

Miniature morning glory with a small perennial caudiciform root. Annual vines to 1–2′, very slender palmate leaves – quite unusual. Charming 1/3″+ pink flowers. Rare species new to cultivation, seed originally collected northwest of Pima, Durango, Mexico. A wonderful diminutive plant for caudiciform collectors. Succulent type soil and a dry winter rest. Z10a?
1? ~? Plant 3 years old $16.50

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Ipomoea crassipes “Uboqo”

Rounded perennial caudex/tuber that can grow quite large with age. Annual trailing stems with leathery simple leaves. Lavender colored flowers. Rare morning glory from grasslands of South Africa’s Eastern Cape. Roots were used as “love charm emetics” and enemas for dysentry by the Zulu. The leaves are reportedly smoked to cure hiccups and the Manyika made good luck and love charms from the roots. Regular succulent care. Z10a?
2? ~? Plants 5+ years old $19.50 each

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Ipomoea platense

Uncommon morning glory that forms a large twisted and branched caudex to 10 pounds. Vigorous purple green vines, palmate leaves and a profusion of 3″ lavender flowers. Endemic to the Rio Plato region of Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay. These plants thrive in warm conditions, like regular water, grow fast and need a large pot to accommodate their caudex. The vine can be trellised and is usually perennial if kept from cold. Plants can be repotted every few years and the roots raised some to show off the beautiful braided caudex. Does well as a houseplant but needs regular pruning. Z9b/10a
1? ~? Plant 3 years old $16.50

24 year old mother plant

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Ipomoea pubescens BK08518.9

Perennial caudiciform roots, annual vine to 6’+. Furry trilobed leaves. Shiny deep blue morning glory blossoms. Our collection, Pisac, Cusco, Peru, near 10,000′. Sparsely distributed from Mexico to Argentina. This is the first introduction of genetics from the Andes into cultivation. Z9b?
2? ~? Plants 2-3 years old $18.50 each

Caudex of mature plant

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Ismene sp. “Peruvian Daffodil”

Amaryllidaceae. Large perennial bulb with strap like annual leaves to 24″. Large yellow-white flowers with a sweet spicy scent. A highly endangered Andean genus, this is an undetermined species, possibly I. hawkesii or a hybrid. Much easier to grow than the Ismene amancaes from the coastal deserts of Lima. Well draining soil and a dry winter rest. Z9a?
2? ~? Plants/bulbs $12.50 each

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Operculicarya decaryi “Madagascar Elephant Tree”

Anacardiaceae. Dioecious pachycaul-caudiciform tree to 20′ with a warty swollen trunk and zi-zag branches. Lovely pinnate leaves with tiny shiny leaflets that turn purple-red in sun or cold. Drought deciduous. Tiny reddish flowers. Toliara, Madagascar. Ideal for bonsai, the roots can be lifted for added aesthetics. Succulent culture, bright light, well draining soil. Mature plants can survive mild frost. Z9b
1? ~? 15″+ treelet with 1/2″+ caudex $24.50*

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Pellaea ovata BK14513.5

Polypodiaceae. Very attractive xerophytic fern. Bipinnate leaves 4–8″+ long, yellow-orange to gray wiry stems. Ovate to triangular leaflets 1/4–1/2″+, deep green with lime green centers. Growing amongst boulders, dry forest understory above the Apurimac, 6600′. Other species of Pellaea are used as stimulants. Should be perfectly adaptable to succulent culture. Z9a/b?
2? ~? Plants 5+ years old $17.50 each

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Peperomia columella GP2250

Piperaceae. 2–5”+ columns of densely packed fat succulent leaves with a shiny windowed surface. Small green-yellow flower spikes. G. Pino collection of this distinctly curious species from north Peru. First intro of this desirable clone, more robust than the widespread Hutchison clone. Z10a
1 ~ 4″ branched plant $18.50

Mother plant

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Peperomia dolabriformis v. multicaulis GP1909 “Congona”

Beautiful, upright, heavily branching succulent species 1–2′ tall. Thick handsome leaves, pleasantly aromatic when crushed. Yellow flower spikes. Seed of this new varietal collected by G. Pino in Cajamarca Dept., San Marcos Prov., Peru. Road from San Marcos to Cajabamba, near La Grama, 7100′. Used as a topical painkiller and anti-inflammatory. Z10a
1? ~? 7–9″ plant 4 years old $17.50

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Peperomia nivalis v. compacta
Small creeping species 2–4”+ tall. Lime green columnar stems covered in densely arranged tiny succulents leaves with windowed upper surfaces. Strong balsamy scent when crushed. Relatively recent discovery from San Marcos, Cajamarca Dept., Peru, near 10,000’. Highly desired because it is one of the more exceptional looking Peperomia. Prefers a bright but cool location and well draining soil. Rare offering of seed grown plants. Z9a/b?
3? ~? 2-4”+ plants 3 years old $22.50 each?

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Puya herzogii BK10511.5

Bromeliaceae. Clusters of 2–3’ rosettes of grey serrated leaves. Large club like inflorescence to 6–8’ tall, flowering bracts covered in a white and grey fuzz, yellow green flowers with bright orange pollen. The impressive flower stalk makes this one of our favorite species. Growing amongst Puya raimondii, near Rodeo, Cochabamba Dept., Bolivia, 13,300’. One of our favorite Puya and the largest plant we’ve offered. Z7/8?
1? ~? 22″+ multi-headed plant 8+ years old $56.50**

Inflorescence in habitat

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Puya lanata “Achupalla”

Rosettes to 3’+ across, dark green leaves with a covering of fine hair-like white scales. Dense cylindrical inflorescence to 10′. Greenish- white flowers. Seed from the western Andes of Cajamarca, north Peru. The source of a gum that was once considered for industrial purposes. Z9b
4? ~? 3″+ plants 3+ years old $12.50 each or 2 for $22

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Puya medica

Dwarf cushion forming species made up of small rosettes 8–12″ wide. Slender serrated silver-green leaves. Small cylindrical flower spike with rose-pink bracts and blue-green flowers. North Peru up to 12,500′. Quite rare. Z8b/9a?
4? ~? 3″+ plants 3+ years old $12.50 each or 2 for $22

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Senecio aff. bombycophole

Asteraceae. Small pachycaul tree with swollen silver-grey trunks. Branches tipped with maple-like leaves covered in a silver-white fuzz. Clusters of yellow flowers. Drought deciduous. Seed from near Huitzeltipec, Puebla, Mexico. A beautiful plant, grow alongside and similar to Bursera. Z9b/10a
2 ~ 5-6″+ plants $18.50 each

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Stephania rotunda “Biralgano”

Menispermaceae. Large hemispherical gray caudex to several feet across. Deciduous twining vines with attractive rounded peltate leaves. Small flowers followed by red berries. Native to thickets and cloud forests from the Indian Himalayas to Southeast Asia, up to 8000′. Alkaloid rich, the plant is used throughout its range for sprains, stomach ache, liver health, fevers, to enhance memory and promote deep sleep. In Nepal the caudex is fed to sick cattle. Recent studies show antioxidant, anticancer and antimalarial activity. Should tolerate some frost if well mulched. Rooted cuts forming nice rounded caudexes. Z9b?
2? ~? Plants with 1″+ caudex $24.50 each

Mother plants

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Andean Ethnobotanicals

Unless noted otherwise only 1 plant of each listing is available!

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Annona muricata? “Graviola” “Guanabana”

Annonaceae. Small evergreen tree to 30′. Ovate leaves, odd yellowish flowers. Large ovoid fruit to 12″, dark green prickled skin, white flesh; aromatic, juicy and acidic. Seed collected by a friend from trees growing at a small farm in the dry forest above the Apurimac, Cusco Dept., Peru. The leaves are pubescent which makes us question the species identification. A popular fruit in the tropics for making refreshing juices, smoothies and sorbets. The leaves are rich in neurotoxic alkaloids and have been used for controversial cancer treatments. Easy to grow, tolerant of poor soils. Z10a
2? ~? 14-18″+ treelets 2-3 years old $22.50 each

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Aspidosperma quebracho-blanco BK151015.1 “Quebracho”

Apocynaceae. Awesome oak-like tree 20–50′ with a crown of weeping branches. Thick cork-like bark, hard yellow-ochre wood highly valued. Whorls of 3 stiff, pointed, green leaves. Small yellow flowers. Native to the Chaco dry forests of Bolivia and Argentina. Seed from the Trichocereus terscheckii dry forests of south Salta, Argentina. The bark is used for lung conditions, fever, as an astringent, general tonic and very famous aphrodisiac. Contains several alkaloids including yohimbine. Drought hardy. The very last plants of this species we have to offer. Z9b/10a?
2? ~? 8–10″ treelets 5+ years old $26.50 each

Aspidosperma/Trichocereus terscheckii dry forest, Salta, Argentina

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Bomarea aff. ovata BK14513.17 “Sullu sullu”

Alstroemeriaceae or Liliaceae. Ornamental twining annual vine to 8’+, clusters of perennial tubers. Green ovate leaves to 3″, lightly fuzzy undersides. Clusters of funnel shaped flowers to 1″ long, outer tepals rose to pink with a green tip. Inner tepals 1/4″ longer than outer, base yellow, tip green with a few dark spots, inner side heavily flecked with black striations. red-pink midstripe. Ovary and pollen green. A “lost” Incan crop, once cultivated for the edible tubers and young asparagus-like shoots. Seed from plants growing in cloudforest, Sunchupata, Cusco Dept. Peru, 9700′. The Andes boasts 80+ species of these fantastic climbing lilies, in addition to edible tubers some species are used to treat venereal disease, infertility, kidney pain and hemorraging. Easily grown, well draining soil, sun to part shade with something to climb on. The vines/stems die back and go dormant during cold or dry spells. Plants winter dormant. Z8?
3? ~? Plants 5+ years old $19.50 each

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Cavendishia capitulata UCSB

Multibranched shrublet 1–3’+ high. Small, dark green, obovate leaves, new growth bronze. Flower clusters with rose bracts and 3–6 tubular purplish flowers with white tips. Round edible berries. Often occurs as an epiphyte, wet tropical forests and cloudforests of Costa Rica, Panama and Columbia up to 9000′. One of the most endearing and diminutive Cavendishia, no less lovely for its size. This boxwood-like accession from UC Santa Barbara has more compact growth and darker green leaves than our other accession originally from the Huntington Gardens. Very first offering, rooted cuttings. Z9b?
2? ~? 14 -16″+ branched plants $44.50* each

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Cavendishia capitulata HBG92102

Multibranched shrublet, Huntington Gardens clone, a bit larger growing than UCSB clone. Flowering sized, branched specimen. Z9b?
1 ~ 16″+ branched plant $42.50*

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Cypella peruviana BK08525.5

Iridaceae. Pleated linear leaves, flower stalk to 2′. Bulbous Iris relatives with large gorgeous flowers with a fruity sweet scent. Bright yellow blooms with a center of mottled red-brown striping. The inner petals have a furry stripe edged with white and metallic blue. Rock outcrops in cloudforest, outside Aguas Caliente, Peru, 7,500′. Used for cough and inflammation. There’s reports of the bulbs being edible and tasty. Z9a
6? ~? Plants 2+ years old $12.50 each or 3 for $30

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Desfontainia spinosa “Taique” “Borrachero”

Desfontainiaceae. Highly ornamental evergreen shrub. Holly-like leaves, 1″ tubular red flowers with yellow tips, yellow-green fruits. Rare throughout its range from the Columbian Andes south to Chile. Considered a monotypic species with a family all its own, yet our perusal of herbarium specimens in Peru suggest to us that either the plant exhibits extreme morphological plasticity or there’s more than one species. We first encountered this awesome plant in 1996 in Cusco, Peru between the ruins of Sayacmarca and Runkurakay at 12,500′. Used as an ethnomedicinal inebriant, possibly a delerient entheogen. The chemistry is poorly understood. Easy to grow, in full sun it stays a bush to 6′, in part shade it can reach 15′ or more. Well drained rich acid soil. Drought tolerant once established, but prefers ample water. Slow and challenging to propagate, easy to grow. We offer rooted cuts from Chilean clones. Z8b
2? ~? 10″+ branched plants $24.50 each

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Disterigma rimbachii HBG95935

Ericaceae. Beautiful multibranched shrub to 1–2′. Small, spirally arranged, oval leaves clothe the stems. New growth is deep red. Rose-pink tubular flowers borne along the stems. Light indigo-purple berries, sweet and juicy. Blueberry kin endemic to the low mountain forests and cloudforests of Ecuador from 2500–10,700′. Filtered light, well draining, moist, acidic soil. Rooted cuttings. One of our favorite neotropical blueberries. Z9b?
1? ~? 9″+ branched plant $38.50

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Escallonia cordobensis BK151018.13

Escalloniaceae. A lovely shrub/small tree to 15’+. Narrow leaves. Clusters of showy white flowers, sweetly scented. Los Gigantes, Sierras Grandes, Cordoba, Argentina, 6400′. Very rare Cordoba endemic threatened by cows. Once a key forest species of this unique mountain range with Polylepis australis and Maytenus boaria. The cows are now the key species here and have decimated the forest, even within much of the national preserve. By its scarcity it appears that the cows find this Escallonia a gustatory delight! The only large plants we saw were restricted to nearly inaccessible cliffs we scaled to collect this seed. Unknown in cultivation until now, conservation propagation is vital. Sun, well draining soil. Rooted cuts. A couple gorgeous specimens with excellent branch form. Z7b?
2? ~? 34 – 40″+ trees $58.50** each

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Eugenia myrcianthes “Ubajai”

Myrtaceae. Small willow-like tree to 15-25′. Pendulous branches, simple glossy leaves, pubescent when young. White flowers and apricot size edible fruit. The flavor of the fruit is excellent when still pale yellow but becomes insipid upon turning a dark yellow/orange. Native to the Rio Plata region, Brazil. Easy to grow ornamental/edible, mature trees tolerant of mild frost. Z9b
2? ~? 6–10″+ treelets 1-2 years old $15.50 each

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Eustephia sp. BK14512.9

Amaryllidaceae. Clustering bulb with slender green leaves. Upright flower stalk with terminal clusters of nodding tubular flowers; dark red with green tips. Steep slopes and embankments near Capuliyoc Pass, northern Cusco Dept., Peru, 9800′. In northern Peru Eustephia are used for wound healing, arthritis, and to undo witchcraft. Easy to grow, winter dormant for us. Give it a dry summer to encourage flowering. First introduction. Z8b?
4? ~? Plants/bulbs $17.50 each

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Fabiana imbricata “Pichi Pichi” “Peta”

Solanaceae. A very beautiful shrub, 3–6’ tall. Tiny, unusual scale like leaves. Bears hundreds of small tubular flowers, white to pale purple in color. Superficially resembles a heather. Native to dry hillsides in southern Chile. Traditionally used as a diuretic for kidney and urinary problems. The dried herb is burned as a ceremonial incense, and is reported to have mild inebriating effects when inhaled. Prefers a well draining soil and full sun. Drought tolerant once established. Z7b?
2? ~? 8-12”+ plants 2-3 years old $16.50 each

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Lapageria rosea “Copihue” “Chilean Bell Flower”

Philesiaceae. Climbing evergreen vine to 20’+. Large 3–4” pendant bell flowers, usually a rich rose color, but occasionally other hues. The national flower of Chile! Cylindrical fruit, sweet and edible. Endemic to the forests of central Chile. The fruit is sometimes brewed into a chicha by the Mapuche. The finest ornamental edible climber there is. Fairly slow growing but easy if given a semi-shady sheltered spot, acid soil, and ample moisture. Z8a–b
Seedling 2+ years old $12.50?
Special 5 plants for $40

Trunk of mature plant

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Lessingianthus asteroflorus BK10509.12 “Orqo yurak yurak”

Asteraceae. Erect plant to 4′ with blue-green simple leaves. The stems, leaves and flower buds are covered in a downy white fur. Clusters of bright purple thistle-like flowers attract butterflies. Seed from near Inkallajta, Cochabamba, Bolivia, 10,000′. A very friendly plant with great horticultural appeal. Used to treat respiratory infections. Regrows from the roots in hard frost. We introduced this gorgeous and cuddly plant to cultivation a decade ago. Z8a–b?
2? ~? Plants 2-3 years old $16.50 each

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Luma chequen “Chequen” “Arrayan Blanco”

Myrtaceae. Evergreen shrub 6–20’+. Small simple leaves, aromatic if crushed. Scented white flowers and dark purple edible berries. Native to central Chile and adjacent Argentina. The fruit are eaten and fermented into chicha by the Mapuche. A rewarding and easy to grow ornamental edible. Drought tolerant once established. Z8a
2? ~? 10-14″+ plants 2-3 years old $16.50 each

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Luzuragia radicans “Quilineja”

Philesiaceae. Creeping, climbing stems to 2–6′. Stiff evergreen leaves. Clusters of citrus scented, delicate white flowers. Red-orange edible berries. Temperate rainforests of Chile. A lovely diminutive relative of Lapageria. Shade, moist acidic soil. Nice in hanging baskets. Z9a/b
4? ~? Plants 4+ years old $14.50 each or 2 for $24

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Macleania insignis ‘Seedling’

Ericaceae. Rooted cuttings from rarely offered seed grown plants, these show interesting variability and quickly develop a fat caudex. Flowers of various shades of red to orange with yellow-white tips, large translucent white edible berries. The leaves occasionally show unusual variegation. Grow like other neotropical blueberries. Z9b
1? ~? 12″+ plant with 2″+ caudex $34.50

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Macleania insignis X Macleania??

Open pollinated hybrid–seedlings already forming caudexes. We expect orange to red or pink tubular flowers and purple-black to white edible berries. First offering. Z9b
2? ~? 4-6″ plants 2-3 years old $18.50 each

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Macleania rupestris ex UCSB81377? “Chamburo”

Semi-epiphytic shrub 2–6’+, branches can become vine-like to 15’+.?Develops a rounded woody caudex?up to 3′ across.?Thick coriaceus leaves. Clusters of up to 20?deep red tubular flowers with white tips. Grape size purple-black edible berries, antioxidant rich. Reported from mountain forests of?southern Mexico?through northern Peru. Jeff Chemick collection, tropical Oaxaca, Mexico. Leaves used as a poultice for bruises, fruit eaten fresh or made into jams and considered efficacious for lung issues and as a nervine. First offering of this accession, rooted cuttings. Z9b/10a?
2? ~? 15 – 16″+ plants $29.50 each

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Methysticodendron amesianum? “Culebra Borrachero”

Solanaceae. Large bush or tree to 20′ tall. Dark green linear leaves up to 1.5′ long. Large, hanging, trumpet like white flowers with a split corolla and intoxicating fragrance. This extremely rare plant, endemic to the Sibundoy Valley of Columbia, is thought to likely be a unique Brugmansia mutation. Used as a medicine and dangerous hallucinogen by the Igano and Kamsa Indians. We helped to introduce this plant to cultivation in the U.S. some years back. Likes rich moist soil and regular feedings. Tolerant of only mild frost. Rooted cuttings. Z9b/10a
inquire

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Morus alba BK151016.6 “Mulberry”

Moraceae. Fast, attractive tree 20–40′. Large foliage provides excellent shade. 1–2″ long purple-black fruit with a superb sweet creamy flavor. San Lorenzo, Salta, Argentina, near 5000′. Introduced to Argentina by the Spanish and now widely planted due to its high esteem by both man and bird. Z5
2? ~? 15–20″+ treelets 4+ years old $18.50 each

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Nicotiana benavidesii BK14516.9

Solanaceae. Bizarre perennial tobacco species to 5’+. Thick, upright to arching stems crowned with bright green heart shaped cordate leaves. Pale yellow-green tubular flowers to 1.5″. Young plants develop a distinct pachycaul stem. Eriotheca dry forest on steep rocky slopes overlooking the Apurimac, near 7600′. Should tolerate tolerate hot, dry conditions well. First introduction. Z10a?
1? ~? 6″ plant 1+ years old $15.50
1? ~? 12″ plant 2-3 years old $24.50
1? ~? 18″ plant 3 years old $32.50*

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Nicotiana cordifolia “Juan Fernandez Tobacco”

Nearly extinct perennial species 3–6’+ tall. Thick, almost pachycaul stems topped with blue/gray/green leathery cordate leaves coated with whitish hairs. 1.5″ long dark purple-violet tubular flowers with some green-yellow streaks. Critically endangered endemic of Alejandro Selkirk Island, Juan Fernandez Archipelago. The small populations are reported to be restricted to a few rocky cliffs. An unusual and beautiful species. Easy to grow, save the seed and pass it on. Z9b?
1? ~? plant 1+ year old $16.50 SOLD

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Pernettya sp. TB17? “Macha-macha”

Ericaceae. Very attractive low growing shrub to 12″+ high. Small glossy leaves densely arranged on the stems, deep red new growth. White bell flowers and pink to lavender-purple berries. Tom Baldwin seed collection from the highlands of Papallacta, Ecuador. This blueberry kin has sweet edible berries that should be eaten in moderation since some Andean Pernettya are known to have bizarre effects on memory and perception if consumed in quantity. Acidic soil, sun to part shade. First introduction. Z8a?
4? ~? 6–12″+ plants 3 years old $16.50 each or 2 for $30

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Piper unguiculatum HBG92065

Piperaceae. Densely branched evergreen shrub to 6’+. Dark green lanceolate leaves, aromatic medicinal/edible. Found in home gardens in southern Mexico and Peru where it is important in ethnomedicine and ceremony. Crushed leaves are used for wound healing, a decoction is used for sore throats and rheumatism. A strong tea is said to have hypnotic properties. The leaves have a wonderful flavor and scent. Prefers filtered light and moisture. Rooted cuttings. Z9a/b
1? ~? 6″+ plant $22.50

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Polylepis australis “Kewina”

Rosaceae. Gorgeous small tree to 15’+ with peeling reddish bark and often gnarled twisted trunks. Pinnate leaves with 5–7 blue-green leaflets. The southernmost species of this Andean genus, occurring all the way into the Cordoba mountains of central Argentina. A keystone species of the high Andean forests which are the most endangered forest ecosystem in the world. This particular species is threatened in habitat by a pathogenic fungus, climate change and lots of cows. Polylepis are used medicinally for lung issues. They are quite adaptable to low elevation cultivation and are truly beautiful trees of unrealized horticultural merit. Z6/7a
2? ~? 16-20″+ trees 3 years old $32.50* each

Tree in habitat

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Prumnopitys andina “Lleuque” “Chilean Plum Yew”

Podocarpaceae. Evergreen yew-like tree, 40–60’+ tall. Form 3/4″ dark purple fruits that are sweet, aromatic and tasty. Endemic to the temperate forests of the lower Andean slopes of south central Chile. Considered highly vulnerable due to habitat loss. The fruit has long been esteemed by the Mapuche and is made into chicha and marmalade. The wood is durable and used in construction. Prefers part shade and moisture. Unsexed rooted cuttings, each from a different clone. Z8a
3 ~ 5-8″+ treelets $22.50 each

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Smilax sp. BK151011.1 “Wild Sarsaparilla”

Smilacaceae. Semi-woody vine to 6 to 30’+. Thorned stems which can get quite thick with age, up 6″. Glossy, dark green lanceolate leaves. Dangling clusters of round berries. Growing through understory shrubs and up into the canopy of trees, cloud forest, San Lorenzo, Salta, Argentina, near 5000′. Rooted cuts. Z9?
1 ~ Plant $18.50

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Solanum ochranthum BK14513.29 (=Lycopersicon ochranthum) “Giant Wild Tomato Vine”

Solanaceae. Large woody vine to 20’+. Furry imparipinnate leaves to 12″+ long. Branched inflorescence with up to 30+ golden-yellow flowers. Clusters of round green fruit 2″+ diameter with a thick, hard skin. Cloud forest near Choquequirao, Peru, 9700′. Recorded from Columbia to Cusco, Peru, this wide range suggests ancient anthropogenic dispersal. Thought to be of potential use in tomato breeding for insect and disease resistance and as a robust grafting stock. A beautiful plant to impress your friends. Z9b
2? ~? 16-20″+ plants 2 years old $16.50* each or 2 for $30

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Stenomesson pearcei BK14513.19 “Chiwanway”

Amaryllidaceae. Large clumping bulb with wide fleshy leaves. 12″+ stalks with clusters of large, pale yellow flowers with inflated tubular corollas. Cloud forest near Sunchupata, northern Cusco Dept., Peru, 9700′. Sun to part shade and well draining soil, similar to succulent care. Give it a couple months dry to induce flowering. Bulbs from several seed grown clones. First introduction. Z8?
4? ~? Plants/bulbs $19.50 each

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Thevetia peruviana

Apocynaceae. Evergreen tropical shrub with slender leaves and showy fragrant yellow flowers. The entire plant contains highly toxic cardiac glycosides. Sometimes utilized as a teacher plant in Amazonian ‘dietas’, not through ingestion but by simply being in the plants presence. The large seed are used in jewelry making. Seed oil has been used as an insecticide and fungicide. Our plants grown from seed from Amazonian Peru. Handle thoughtfully. Tolerant of high temperatures and some drought. Z10a?
3? ~? 20-24″+ plants 2 years old $16.50* each

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Trema micrantha BK14516.5

Cannabaceae. Awesome dry forest tree to 25’+. Spreading branches with drooping alternate lanceolate leaves with a rough surface. Small greenish yellow flowers and little round red to black berries along the stems. Fairly common in the dry forest near the Apurimac, 5800’. This pioneer species is reported throughout tropical America and has been used in reforestation efforts. Plants from this locale should be much more adapted to arid conditions. Z10a?
1 ~ 12”+ treelet 2-3 years old $28.50*?

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Tweedia caerulea (=Oxypetalu caeruleum) “Blue Milkweed”

Asclepiadaceae. Bush to small twining vine to 3-10′. Soft velvety ovate leaves. Axillary clusters of deep sky blue flowers with darker turquoise centers. 4″ seed pods. A great nectar and host plant for butterflies and their larvae, known to attract Monarchs. Native to southern Brazil, Uruguay, possibly Argentina. Tolerant of full sun and some drought but prefers regular water. Resprouts from roots after a hard frost. Z7b
4? ~? 12″+ plants 1-2 years old $12.50 each or 2 for $22

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Ugni candollei “Chilean Dream Guava” “Trautrau”

Myrtaceae. Evergreen shrub to 4’+. Dark green leaves with pale undersides. White flowers and rose colored ovoid berries produced in great abundance. The sweet-tart fruit ripen mid-summer for us, months before U. molinae. Endemic to a small area of south Central Chile. The fruit is eaten fresh, brewed into an inebriating chicha by the Mapuche and a preparation of the plant is said to induce dreaming. We sought this rarity for years and are excited to be able to share seedlings for the very first time. Easy to grow like other Ugni, sun to part shade. Z8b/9a?
2? ~? 4-6″+ plants 1 year old $24.50 each

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Edibles, Medicinals, etc.

Unless noted otherwise only 1 plant of each listing is available!

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Acacia sp. TB ‘Lake Rowallan’

Fabaceae. A beautiful “Blackwood” species said to be “absolutely gorgeous”. Seed collected by T. Baldwin from Lake Rowallan, Tasmania. Should be quite hardy. Z7/8?
4? ~? 16-24″+ treelets 1-2 years old $17.50* each for 2 for $29.50

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Agapetes lacei “Tibetan Huckleberry”

Ericaceae. Caudiciform epiphyte with long arching branches. Little oval leaves densely packed in a spiral formation. New growth is pink. Clusters of intense red tubular flowers with green tips. Glossy deep red edible berries–the “cherry” of huckleberries. Native to the cloud forests of Burma, Tibet and Yunnan,China. This rare species is one of our favorites in this impressive genus. Rooted cuts. Z9a?
1 ~ Plant $28.50 SOLD

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Betula utilis CC5763 “Bhojapatra” “Himalayan Birch”

Betulaceae. A gorgeous medium sized birch tree 20–35′ tall. Exceptional white, gold and copper peeling bark. The leaves turn a rich yellow and defoliate in Autumn. From seed collected by Chadwell at 12,500′ Langtang, Nepal, just south of the Tibetan border. An important tree, the bark is used for wound healing and as a carminative. In India the resin is reportedly contraceptive. Widely used for construction, the tree is now considered endangered in some regions due to deforestation. Easy to grow, does well in most soils. Z7a
2? ~? 36″+ treelets 11+ years old $36.50** each

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Hippophae rhamnoides “Sea Buckthorn”

Elaeagnaceae. A striking willow-leafed shrub 10–20′. In Autumn the branches are covered in thousands of small edible orange berries. Native to Central Asia. This fruit is very nutritious, rich in vitamin C, A and E as well as EFA’s and the leaves are a source of antioxidant flavonoids. This plant is now an important medicinal fruit crop in western Europe, Asia and Russia, but is gaining popularity in the United States as a nutriceutical and cosmetics ingredient. A highly versatile plant, fixes nitrogen in the soil. Unsexed plants. Z3a?
1? ~? 12″+ plant 8 years old $22.50*

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Lycium barbarum ‘Large Leaf’ “Wolfberry” “Gou Qi Zi” “Goji Berry”

Solanaceae. Deciduous shrub with arching branches, 3–6′ tall. Edible lanceolate leaves to 5″ long and 3″ wide. Pale purple flowers, 1/4–1/2″ red berries. Native to the Himalayan foothills of central Asia. The leaves are eaten and the berries are one of the most nutritious foods known to man. A traditional Chinese longevity enhancer and sexual tonic. This is a plant we selected that has extra large leaves, excellent for food. Though the berries are a little smaller, it fruits more heavily and consistently for us than others we’ve grown. Rooted cuttings from our most productive mother plant. Z6a
2? ~? 16″+ plants $19.50* each

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Mystroxylon aethiopicum “Kooboo Berry”

Celastraceae. Evergreen shrub to small tree with leathery simple leaves. Axillary clusters of small yellow-green scented flowers and 1/2″+ pink-red to purple edible fruit with a sweet-tart flavor. Native to the bushveld and forests of southern Africa. Root bark used for dysentery, the hard wood for tool handles and firewood. Makes a nice edible ornamental, fruits when small. Drought hardy and tolerant of some frost. Z9a/b
1 ~ 5″+ plant 2 years old $16.50

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Mandragora autumnalis “Autumn Mandrake”

Solanaceae. Hardy perennial with rosettes of large dark green leaves. Purple bell shaped flowers arise from the center of the plant followed by oval shaped orange berries. Large roots sometimes resembling the human form and giving rise to a multitude of myths and legends. Native to Europe, one of the species of the infamous mandrake root, used throughout the ages as aphrodisiac and poison, magical amulet and medicine. Prefers rich, alkaline, moist soil with good drainage. Summer dormant. Does well in the rock garden. Z5a
2? ~? Plants 2–3 years old $18.50 each

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Tiliacora triandra “Bai Yanang” “Jello Plant”

Menispermaceae. Large twining vine with lime-green heart shaped leaves. Clusters of yellow flowers and round red fruit. May form a tuber/caudex with age. Native to forests of Southeast Asia. In Thailand and Laos a juice from the leaves is used as a thickening agent for making kaeng no mai soup and surong sam “jello”. Rich in antioxidant phytonutrients that studies have shown to have anti-intoxicative, neuroprotective and cognitive enhancing effects, especially in alcoholic rats! Leafy shoots are also a traditional cure for dysentry. Easy to grow, give it plenty of room to climb. Rooted cuttings. Z9b?
3 ~ Plants $16.50 each

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Vaccinium sp. ‘Borneo’

Ericaceae. Evergreen shrub to 5’+, shiny, leathery obovate leaves, new growth an attractive bronze. White flowers, blue-green edible fruit. Mt. Kinabalu, Borneo, an area rich in Ericaceae. Shows similarity with the endangered V. whitmorei known only from Pahang. A must for blueberry afficianados. Rooted cuts. Z9a?
2 ~ Plants $22.50 each

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Puya raimondii, Winchus, Cordillera Negra, Ancash, Peru 2009 Copyright B. Kamm

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